You Don't Buy Things With Money

You Don't Buy Things With Money

I was recently talking with a colleague who said he was close to retiring.  Gil (not his real name) is in his early fifties and slightly quirky.  He’s the type of guy who marches to the beat of his own drummer.  Although he works for a large, corporate-think company, he sports a long beard and tattoos.  He’ll freely talk about politics and other matters that most folks would shy away from.  With his wife, he lives in the country – far away from the hustle and bustle of society.

It had been a while since I talked with Gil so his mention of retirement was exciting.  I told him congratulations.  He said he was more than ten years ahead of what society had scheduled for his retirement, mostly because he’d been debt free, including his home, for many years.  He’s got a rental house which has some debt on it, but that payment is being covered by someone else.

I loved hearing he was free of consumer debt and asked him what led him to that point.  Almost everyone who is debt-free has a story about a moment of awakening to the soul crushing weight of financial liability.  Gil said he got himself into a position to retire, based upon some advice he was given when he was young.  Gil said once he fully grasped that concept, his life changed.

Being on a quest for knowledge that can help me grow, I immediately asked, “What was it?”

The advice, he said, was, “You don’t buy things with money, you buy them with time.”

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How Much Stuff Do You Really Need?

How Much Stuff Do You Really Need?

USA Today and The New York Times (among many others) have published articles about the Baby Boomer generation starting to pass down treasured heirlooms to their GenX and Millennial children.  Unfortunately, those trinkets and other items are being looked upon with some disdain.

We don’t want them.

We don’t value these items the same way our parents did or their parent’s generation did.

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Sometimes Taking The Penalty Is The Smart Play

Sometimes Taking The Penalty Is The Smart Play

I love hockey. As I write this, the third round of the playoffs is in full swing and the only thing that isn’t awesome about it is that my team isn’t playing. Sad face emoticon.

As in all sports, there are rules. Sometimes players break those rules and there is a consequence. In hockey, that usually takes the form of a player being sent to the penalty box for a period of time and his team being shorthanded on the ice for the duration of that penalty. It is a pretty significant disadvantage for the team that is down a player, and sometimes it results in a goal against (statistically about 1 in 5 times, but that varies depending on how good the players are). Once in a while, the shorthanded team will score (a much, much lower statistic that I am too lazy to Google at the moment). The outcome of a game can turn on a penalty and a resulting power play goal. Coaches bench players over it. The ‘skate of shame’ back to the player’s bench from the penalty box after a goal is scored during a penalty the player took is one of the most dreaded moments a player can experience. Generally, it is considered a bad idea to take a penalty.

Generally.

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