Admitting Failure

Admitting Failure

If you’re a fight fan, you may have watched the much-hyped spectacle of Mayweather – McGregor this past weekend.  If you don’t like combat sports, you probably heard about the big fight nonetheless.  Floyd Mayweather, one of the best boxers to ever step in the ring, squared off with Conor McGregor, the biggest name currently in mixed martial arts.  McGregor fought by boxing rules (no kicks or wrestling), so it was a bit slanted, but the fight was promoted to epic portions nonetheless.

Both men are talented fighters, and egotistic, trash talkers as well.  They spent months promoting what became known as “The Money Fight.”  McGregor had the opportunity to make over $100 million for the fight while Mayweather had the chance to make three times as much.

Following the 10th round technical knockout win by Floyd Mayweather, Conor McGregor was interviewed in the ring by Jim Gray.  Gray asked him if he was happy with how he performed in the fight even though he lost.

“I’ve been strangled on live TV and came back,” he said.

McGregor was talking about his loss to mixed martial artist Nate Diaz where he was defeated by submitting to a rear naked chokehold.  They then had a rematch where McGregor defeated Diaz by decision.  It was a bloody battle that any MMA fan will tell you was an instant classic.  McGregor went on to drop into another weight class and beat the champion there.  He didn’t let his defeat hold him back; it propelled him forward.

The Money Fight itself was interesting to watch, but it was the lesson in MacGregor’s post-fight statement that stuck with me. 

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Are You Building Your Habits by Feel?

Are You Building Your Habits by Feel?

I’ve been reading about habits lately and will soon share my thoughts on a couple fantastic books.  First, Rich Habits by Thomas C. Corley is a quick, easy read and can be knocked out in an afternoon.  The second, The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg is a more in-depth study of habits.  I read it two years ago and felt a need to re-read it again due to my experience with Building-Income.

Focusing on habits was spurred by reading many blogs that continually hit on the subject.  Some may not realize they are even talking about habits when they discuss a chosen topic.  It’s one of the over-arching issues with personal finance and investing.

Last week, I slid into a depression and stopped writing in the morning.  My work on the blog faltered and I had a hard time keeping up with my social media responsibilities.  I also stopped working on my fiction projects.  Luckily, I still hammered out my work responsibilities, but when I returned home I dropped on the couch, grabbed the remote and started Netflix.

It was more than a full week before creativity returned and I wanted to get in front of the keyboard.

So, with all my previous focus on habits, specifically my habits, how did I so easily fall apart last week?

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When the Student is Ready

When the Student is Ready

My girlfriend is smart.

I’d like to say she’s smart for being my girlfriend, but it’s the other way around.  I out-kicked my coverage when I met her.  She’s very bright and will engage in conversations on a variety of subjects.  If she’s not well-versed on the subject matter, she won’t fake it, but she will listen intently and try to provide feedback where valuable.

Once when we were talking, she referenced a quote she’d heard many times over the years.  “When the student is ready, the teacher will appear.”

I thought it was a great statement and have tried to learn its origin.  It seems there’s dispute on who is responsible for it and I’m not going to get into that discussion here.

Regardless, I dug the quote and have even repeated it myself a few times when situations arose where I thought it applied. 

It wasn’t until recently that I started to comprehend what it really means.

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How Getting Knocked Out Financially is Easier Than You Think

How Getting Knocked Out Financially is Easier Than You Think

When I was in my late twenties, I found myself with roughly $32,000 of debt.  The debt, mostly consumer, had been rolled into a second mortgage to ease the burden of the various monthly payments.  As things happen, I ended up divorced and that debt became solely mine as part of the settlement.  I’m not bitter nor blaming anyone.  It’s the way life goes and how I ended up where I am today.

I later remarried bringing this debt into that marriage.  Unfortunately, she also brought $14,000 worth of debt for a combined $48,000 worth of debt.

I made good money, but lived paycheck to paycheck.  It was frustrating to live that way.  I wanted more out of life, but couldn’t figure out how to get it. 

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Everyone Has a Journey

Everyone Has a Journey

Several years back, I helped run a Kenpo Karate school.  Part of my responsibilities were leading classes, both for adults and kids.  As I interacted with various students, I sought to understand their motivation for learning Kenpo.

Some of them were there to learn self-defense, an obvious goal due to the subject matter.  Others were there to increase their physical fitness, again, a somewhat understandable goal. 

However, there were those who sought the community aspects of a karate school.  They were looking to “belong” somewhere. 

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